Themes from American Literature

November 7, 2009 at 5:55 pm (1)

While I was reading, I discovered a theme realted to American Literature. In the novel it says, “She looks up at him and sees the vaccum where curiosity out to lodge. And something more. The total abscence of human recognition-the glazed separeteness. She does not know what keeps his glance suspended. Perhaps because he is grown, or a man, and she a little girl. But she has seen interest, disgust, even anger in grown male eyes. Yet this vaccum is not new to her. It has an edge; somewhere in the bottom lid is the distance. She has seen it lurking in the eyes of all white people. So. The distate must be for her, her blackness. All things in her are flux and anticipation. But her blackness is static and dread. And it is the blackness that accounts for, that creates, the vaccum edged with distaste in white eyes” (Morrison 49). In this statement, the reader can conclude one of the themes presented in the novel. One of the themes of this novel relates to American literature. The theme of this novel is: Racisim will always exist in society. The man at the grocery store looked at Pecola with so much hate and disgust only because of the color of her skin. I believe there is at least one more theme from American Literature in the novel, but I am only halfway through the book. Keep checking out my blogs!

Another theme from American Literature that I found in the novel was identity defines one’s place in society. For example in the novel it says,  “Each night, without fail, she prayed for blue eyes. Fervently for a year, she had prayed. Although somewhat discouraged, she was not without hope.  To have something as wonderful as that happen, would take a long, long time.” Maybe they’d say, “Why, look at pretty-eyed Pecola. We mustn’t do bad things in front of those pretty eyes” (Morrison 46). Pecola wanted to change her identity by changing her physical appearance. She prayed so that she could have blue eyes so that people will not crticize her because of her race.

Please note: I added one more theme after the initial five posts were due, since I found one while reading.

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Image Study

November 7, 2009 at 5:27 pm (1)

http://artcentric.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/bluest_eye-7096431.jpgbluest_eye-7096431

   This is the front cover of the novel. As we can see, there is a black child who has her arms crossed. She looks very lonely and is in the hope of a better future. This child could be Pecola, Frieda, or Claudia. The three girls are not treated fairly with respect in society only because of the color of  their skin. Furthermore, Pecola prays constantly to God for beauty so that she will be loved by others. However, she does not know what’s coming her way…

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Image Study

November 7, 2009 at 4:54 pm (1)

httv_maryjanep://www.candywrappermuseum.com/13_vices/v_maryjane.jpg

“Each pale yellow wrapper has a picture on it. A pictur of little Mary Jane, for whom the candy is named. Smiling white face. Blonde hair in gentle disarray, blue eyes looking at her out of a world of clean comfort. The eyes are petulant, mischievous. To Pecola, they are simply pretty. She eats the candy, and its sweetness is good. To eat the candy is somehow to eat the eyes, eat Mary Jane. Love May Jane. Be Mary Jane” (Morrison 5o). Pecola is so desperate to feel pretty that she goes out and buys a Mary Jane candy bar to feel as if she has blue eyes and blonde hair. As Pecola says, to eat a Mary Jane candy bar is as if eating her blue eyes.  (Continued on next page!)

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Image Study

November 7, 2009 at 3:38 pm (1)

heart http://oneyearbibleimages.com/heart.jpg

 

   As we all know, a heart symbolizes love. Some of the characters in the novel such as Pecola is curious about how can you make someone  love you. For instance, Pecola asks Claudia and Freida who are sisters how do you make someone love you. Pecola says, “How do you get somebody to love you” ( Morrison 32).  Pecola is determined to to get blue eyes so that she will be gorgeous and find her love. However, this could lead to a tragedy……! I like this book. I am not done with  the entire book, but I have a feeling this novel will make me cry. Anyways, stay tuned for more blogs to find out about the tragedy.

 

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Image Study

November 7, 2009 at 3:06 pm (1)

Blue eye                     

This is a picture of a blue eye which represents a symbol throughout the novel. There is a passage in the novel which implies why the blue eye is a symbol; “It had occured to Pecola some time ago that if her eyes, those eyes of hers were different, that is to say, beautiful, she herself would be diferent. Each night, without fail, she prayed for blue eyes. Fervently, for a year, she had prayed. Although somewhat discouraged, she was not without hope. To have something  as wonderful as that, would take a long long time” (Morrison 46). Pecola wishes that she had pretty, blue eyes so that she would look beautiful. She is unhappy with her identity, and feels that she is looked down upon because she does not have blue eyes. However, she does not give up hope. Pecola continues to pray for blue eyes.

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Testing to see if this really works! (Does not count as a post)

October 26, 2009 at 7:31 pm (Does this blog work?)

This is cool! 🙂

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